Einkorn Flour

I’ve read a few things about einkorn flour, so have kept my eye out for it. I happened across some BC-grown einkorn in my local organic food store. I thought I’d give it a try. The package insisted it could used one for one for regular whole wheat flour. The only way to find out is to try!

I started with my favourite whole wheat bread recipe. While everything turned out OK, I’m afraid the assertions on the package don’t hold.

  • The einkorn didn’t absorb as much water as the regular whole wheat bread flour I buy. The dough was significantly wetter. In the future I’ll reduce the water somewhat.
  • It took longer for the gluten to form (a few extra minutes on the mixer). I’m sure this is at least in part caused by the excess water.
  • The dough rose significantly faster. I usually let the dough rise 90 minutes first and then 60 in the loaf pans. It should probably be half that with the einkorn. The result was bread that largely deflated in the oven. Still tall enough to cut and eat (taller than the denser multi-grain and oatmeal breads), but without the nice domed tops I usually get with whole wheat and white breads.

Fortunately, the bread still tasted great and had the nice soft texture I love most about this particular recipe. It’s definitely a stronger flavour (and a darker colour), but it’s delicious.

Ultimately, the flour is quite a bit more expensive, so I doubt I’ll make it again soon. I do want to try this recipe with freshly ground wheat to see how that compares, too. If you’ve baked with einkorn before, I’d love to hear any tips.

Profile Photo Aaron Dalton aaron@daltons.ca Aaron Dalton Perlkönig Perlkonig Canada Alberta --05-09 Gamer, programmer, editor, baker